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The Democratic Peoples' Republic of Korea reviewed at 6th UPR session
Tuesday, 08 December 2009 14:01

 

On 7 December 2009, the Working Group on the UPR examined the human rights situation in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK). The DPRK was represented by the Ambassador of the DPRK to the United Nations at Geneva, Mr Ri Tcheul. A small number of States, including Pakistan, China, Cuba and Myanmar offered no criticism of the human rights situation in the DPRK, but rather praised the DPRK’s accomplishments in the field of human rights, particularly in its efforts to provide universal free health care and education. Most States, however, were extremely critical and expressed serious concern relating to the following issues:

  • Reports of forced labour, inadequate conditions, cruel and inhumane treatment, and executions in political prison camps
  • The use of torture by police officers and prison officials
  • Reports of enforced disappearances, particularly of foreign nationals, and failure to follow up with the Working Group on Forced or Involuntary Disappearances
  • Concern that trials of persons accused of crimes, especially political crimes, do not meeti international standards of fairness because of a lack of independence of the judiciary, lack of access to legal counsel, confessions given under torture, and the need to provide human rights education to prosecutors, lawyers, and law enforcement officials
  • Public executions and the use of the death penalty for crimes which are not clearly defined
  • Harsh penalties against those who express religious beliefs, despite the fact that freedom of religion is enshrined in the Constitution of the DPRK 
  • Severe restrictions on freedom of expression and harsh penalties for expressing certain political views or criticism of the Government
  • The absence of freedom of movement in the DPRK and harsh punishments against those repatriated to the DPRK after leaving the State without prior permission
  • Disparity in access to basic services, including access to food, on the basis of political belief or social status
  • Barriers to the realisation of the right to food for all, such as prioritization of food distribution to the military and other privileged groups, lack of access for humanitarian organizations, and the need for diversification of food production
  • The need for increased cooperation with the international human rights community, including access to the DPRK for UN special procedures, joining the International Labour Organisation, and ratification of core human rights treaties, especially the Convention against Torture
  • Vulnerability of and discrimination against women, including lack of political participation of women, domestic violence, and violence against women in prisons and labour camps
The draft report of the review of the DPRK will be adopted by the Working Group on 9 December 2009.

 

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On 7 December 2009, the Working Group on the UPR examined the human rights situation in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK). The DPRK was represented by the Ambassador of the DPRK to the United Nations at Geneva, Mr Ri Tcheul. A small number of States, including Pakistan, China, Cuba and Myanmar offered no criticism of the human rights situation in the DPRK, but rather praised the DPRK’s accomplishments in the field of human rights, particularly in its efforts to provide universal free health care and education. Most States, however, were extremely critical and expressed serious concern relating to the following issues:

 

·         Reports of forced labour, inadequate conditions, cruel and inhumane treatment, and executions in political prison camps

·         The use of torture by police officers and prison officials

·         Reports of enforced disappearances  

·         Concern that trials of persons accused of crimes, especially political crimes, do not meeti international standards of fairness  

·         Public executions and the use of the death penalty for crimes which are not clearly defined

·       Severe restrictions on freedom of religion and freedom of expression 

·         The absence of freedom of movement in the DPRK and harsh punishments against those repatriated to the DPRK after leaving the State without prior permission

·         Disparity in access to basic services, including access to food, on the basis of political belief or social status

·         Barriers to the realisation of the right to food for all, such as prioritization of food distribution to the military and other privileged groups, lack of access for humanitarian organizations, and the need for diversification of food production

·         The need for increased cooperation with the international human rights community, including access to the DPRK for UN special procedures, joining the International Labour Organisation, and ratification of core human rights treaties, especially the Convention against Torture 

·         Vulnerability of and discrimination against women, including lack of political participation of women, domestic violence, and violence against women in prisons and labour camps


 [WU1]Why, more detail?

 [WU2]More detail, including examples of questions or recs

 [WU3]in what context for both - more detail

Last Updated on Tuesday, 04 May 2010 10:18
 
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